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illustration: cicada

May 30, 2021

Where were you 17 years ago? Well, that is the last time the Brood X bugs were around, making ruckus in the trees. The Cicadas are here! Don’t be afraid. They may look creepy. One may smack you in the head by mistake, when flying clumsily, but they are harmless. They are simply out to look for a mate.

These red-eyed Cicadas are only in certain states on the East coast and the Midwest. So get out there and check them out because you’ll have to wait another 17 years to see them again.

Here’s a drawing I did of one critter, hanging out high in the canopy. Can you hear it buzzing away?

Happy Memorial Weekend all!

While canoe/kayak fishing, I put Fenwick Eagle 2-Piece rod to the test to see if I can pull in a powerful fish. The quality spinning rod is medium fast with excellent feedback, but how is its strength? I hope to catch a bass, but I end up fighting a fish that is even stronger, heavier and quite possibly my personal best in weight!

Plus, I get a sighting of several Bald Eagles, flying, perched and… walking?!

Check out my video, and enjoy.

Thank you for watching everybody!
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The following gear appear in this video:
Fenwick Eagle Spinning 2-piece rod
Gamakatsu Octopus Circle Hook (size 8)
Reaction Tackle – Lead Drop Shot, 1/8 oz
Stren Original Monofilament 10 lb test
Boga Grip
Frabill Power Stow Net 20×24 Hoop 36in Sliding Handle
Aqua Bound Sting Ray Hybrid 2-Piece Kayak Paddle
Panasonic HC-V800 HD Camcorder
GoPro Hero 8 Black

drawing: the kingfisher

February 22, 2021

While I was fishing the other day, a bird, perched over the water, caught my eye. At first, I thought it was a Blue Jay because, well, it was blue, and it had a crest on its head. But then, it made a nice subtle chirping. Blue Jays actually make a loud alarming sound. So I knew this bird was different.

I continued to fish. An hour or so later, I saw the bird again. This time, the bird had a Bluegill in its mouth. The bluegill was almost as big as the bird itself! I suddenly realized that this bird is a Kingfisher!

I’ve seen nature shows that featured kingfishers and how good they are at catching their food from the water. And here it is right before my eyes. In honor of the sighting, I just had to draw the cute little bugger (when I got home).

Sorry to get so excited but I always wanted to see this amazing little bird in person. Plus, I am a birder enthusiast AND I love fishing. Birds that are made for catching fish are a win-win in my book :)

If you like Outdoor & Nature art, please feel free to check out my shop.

How many times have you went fishing and only got one fish? Well, it happens to everybody, once and again, so don’t feel bad. In this video, I compile 3 moments, from the year, when it happened to me, but I saw it as a positive that I did not get skunked and I was able to catch something.

This video is a special edition of my Bite-sized Fishing series, meaning that I only catch one fish each time, but still fun! I show you the 3 ways I catch (and release) the fish. Check out my short video and enjoy.

Catch #1 – While pier fishing, I get a fat aggressive 9-inch Bluegill caught on a large crankbait.
Catch #2 – While bank fishing, I get another nice Bluegill, that is dark-colored, caught on a bobber rig with a Berkley worm.
Catch #3 – While canoe fishing, I get a 2-pound toothy Chain Pickerel that is caught with a Yozuri 3DB jerkbait.

Thanks for watching and thanks for your support!
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berkley_gulp_nightcrawler_for_panfish

On a summer day, I fish (catch and release) for Panfish, such as Bluegill and Crappie, using a realistic-looking worm. I test the product to see if the plastic bait, called Berkley Gulp Nightcrawlers, actually work to attract fish. Watch my video and find out :)

In this video, I fish so late into the evening that the Geese fly home and the Bats come out!

telescoping travel rod

Fishing rods are very long and can be cumbersome to carry around. Have no fear, I found a rod that is collapsible and portable. This 7-foot long Telescoping Rod by Kastking can pack down to under 22 inches! I originally got it so that I can travel more easily on a plane because the rod fits nicely in your luggage. However, with the virus scare going on, I am not planning to fly anytime soon. So, now I just use the travel rod more locally. It is nice to just stash it in the car and be ready whenever I feel like going to a nearby pond.

Check out my test and review video :)

Also, in the video, I encounter a young Raccoon, while I am canoeing. The little raccoon is interested in me. He stares and keeps scratching. Itchy are we?

drifting worm in creek

Here is a lazy weekend video, simple fishing for Bluegill in a small creek. During this outing, I get some nice surprises. My first Green Sunfish which looks like a miniature version of a Largemouth Bass. It is a new species for me. And I get a nice-sized Smallmouth Bass, hiding among the school of bluegill.

Plus, I see an Egret bird with a fish catch of its own, a baby catfish. The catfish is a little too big to fit in the egret’s throat. Oops!

Feel free to check out my video :)

Happy 4th of July, everybody!

sketch: bluegill

June 28, 2020

bluegill_by_al_lau_v2

As small as the Bluegill is, this sunfish has an amazing spectrum of colors. It’s like a jewel that is often overlooked and underappreciated from our rivers and lakes. Watch out when giving them a worm while fishing, they have an attitude of a shark!

This is my lazy Sunday sketch. Happy weekend all.

sketch: box turtle

June 12, 2020

box_turtle_by_al_lau

The Box Turtle (Terrapene Carolina) is native to North America, and is easily identified by their high dome-shaped shell, colored yellow, orange and brown. They grow up to 7 inches and can live as long as 40 years.

My drawing of the turtle, which primarily lives on land, is enjoying itself in safety of the grass. Have you seen a box turtle lately?

everglades_wildlife_by_al_lau_A

The Florida Everglades is home to many unique fauna and flora. I created a 2-D diorama illustration, featuring nature that is native to the wetlands. The print size is 11×17 on 13×19 paper. It includes the Alligator, birds, turtles and fish. All thriving along the Mangroves.

everglades_wildlife_by_al_lau_B

As a bonus, there is an accompanying animal identification chart on 8 x 10 size print, naming the Everglades flora and fauna. I was inspired by seeing museum dioramas of animal life in their environment. I match them up by shape and numbers. The print is available at my shop. Check it out :)

This is the last element in the Everglades outdoor and nature series. I hope you enjoyed my videos and artwork!

By the way, can you name any of the animals in the drawing?

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