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On an ominous foggy winter day, I go canoe fishing and use the Humminbird Fishing Buddy 120 to help me find a fish in a barren lake. It is hard to spot any fish in this cold water because they are all gone, dispersed or simply lethargic. Eventually, I do catch a nice fish, and its a new species for me! What do you think I catch?

By the way, remember the Kingfisher I had mentioned in my previous post? Well, I feature the sighting of that very bird, as it is scouting for food, in my video. Luckily, I have my camera and that is how I am able to draw a rendition of the little critter (when I got home later).

In a way, the Kingfisher and I compete to catch a fish. Who will win this competition? Check out my video and enjoy!

drawing: the kingfisher

February 22, 2021

While I was fishing the other day, a bird, perched over the water, caught my eye. At first, I thought it was a Blue Jay because, well, it was blue, and it had a crest on its head. But then, it made a nice subtle chirping. Blue Jays actually make a loud alarming sound. So I knew this bird was different.

I continued to fish. An hour or so later, I saw the bird again. This time, the bird had a Bluegill in its mouth. The bluegill was almost as big as the bird itself! I suddenly realized that this bird is a Kingfisher!

I’ve seen nature shows that featured kingfishers and how good they are at catching their food from the water. And here it is right before my eyes. In honor of the sighting, I just had to draw the cute little bugger (when I got home).

Sorry to get so excited but I always wanted to see this amazing little bird in person. Plus, I am a birder enthusiast AND I love fishing. Birds that are made for catching fish are a win-win in my book :)

If you like Outdoor & Nature art, please feel free to check out my shop.

dropshot for panfish

Bald Eagles are making a comeback, including in my area. I get a sighting of family of eagles, the mother and its offspring. Interestingly, the young eagle looks a little odd because it does not have a bald crown like an adult. The young has a blotchy feather pattern.

Plus, while fishing from the river edge, I use worms on the drop shot rig, and experiment with different lengths. between the hook and sinker. Success depends on the depth, structure and the kind of fish you are seeking.

Is the drop shot with worms effective for catching fish? What kind of fish am I able to catch on this presentation? Watch my short video and find out :)  Thanks for watching and enjoy!

osprey_by_al_lau

I am working on a series of sketches about Florida wildlife. I am hoping to tie the illustrations with a video I am also creating on the Everglades.

For starters, today’s drawing is of a predatory Osprey bird, swooping across the sky to catch a nice fish for a meal.

Stay tuned for more :)

Happy weekend!

sketch: canada goose

April 4, 2020

goose_by_al_lau

Today, I draw an exciting subject, a Canadian Goose! Okay. I’m kinda joking. We see these geese every day that we are bored of seeing them. Am I right? Canada geese are so prolific, it is easy to find a model for my drawing. Question: Why do we call them Canada Geese if they are too lazy to fly back to Canada anymore?

The plus side of staying at home is having more time to be creative. For me, it is creating videos and doing drawings.

I feel like I tend to be too rigid in my art. So I wanted to challenge myself to be more loose with this sketch. And that makes it so much more fun and freeing! That is exactly what we need at this time, to be able to not over-do it and liberate ourselves from the stress :)

Thank you Mr Goose for making oblong shapes so fun to draw.

 

 

While canoeing in the Upstate New York, I made a short video about my search of the elusive Loon bird. During the trip, I also visit an Outdoor Store, go Camping, and do some Fishing. Plus, I catch a new fish, my first Chub. Check it out and Enjoy!

Have you ever heard a Loon call?

The following gear I used in this video:
Fenwick Eagle Spinning 2-piece rod
https://amzn.to/2N7D9R2
St. Croix Triumph Spinning Rod 6′ 6″ (TRS66MF2)
https://amzn.to/2NCxXHE
Daiwa Procyon EX Spinning Reel 3000
https://amzn.to/2tCZgX7
Berkley Trilene XL Monofilament 8lb Low Vis Green
https://amzn.to/2Kdd8BM
Frabill Power Stow Net 20×24 Hoop 36in Sliding Handle
https://amzn.to/2LqiUwv
Aqua Bound Sting Ray Hybrid 2-Piece Kayak Paddle
https://amzn.to/2q7sWK3
Crocs black
https://amzn.to/2D3tZBL
Sony RX100 20.2 MP Digital Camera w/ 1-inch sensor
https://amzn.to/2PNJTUW
GoPro Hero 6
https://amzn.to/2LtDADG

sketch: mockingbird

April 7, 2018

northern_mockingbird_by_al_lau

I see a variety of birds out the window when they are on the bird feeder. I recognize most of the kinds of birds that visit, but there is a new one this year that I have never seen before. It is rather elagant, longer and more slender than most songbirds, and it actually is staying around most of the winter. So I call him “my bird”. Interestingly, he is not afraid of me when I approach. After many searches in guides, I finally know what it is – A Northern Mockingbird. I also learn that mockingbirds are omnivorous, which means they enjoy eating insects in addition to seeds. They are known for their elaborate collection of vocalizations.

My drawing is dedicated to him. It won’t be long before the warm spring weather will bring plenty of food for him to eat elsewhere. Maybe he will sing one more song before he flies away.

sketch: titmouse

March 24, 2018

titmouse_by_al_lau

I like to observe different birds that come to the feeder. During the recent Nor’easter (the 4th snowstorm of the season), birds come in large numbers to the deck in need of rest and sustenance. Bird feeders are a lifeline for winter birds. Essentially, birds need to consume nearly half their own weight per day to make it through a cold winter day.

This is my drawing of Titmouse, one of the birds that visits me. It is a small yet handsome songbird with its pointy head crest. Titmouse is a funny name. Somebody must have been tipsy when they named the bird.

drawing: sparrow

March 10, 2018

sparrow_by_al_lau

I look forward to seeing the variety of songbirds, like Sparrows, on my bird feeders. It is a calming routine to look out the window. I make sure the feeder is full of seeds because birds are so important to our daily life. Birds keep the population of nuisant insects in check, contribute to the pollination of plants and flowers, and simply make us happy when they sing. My indoor cats enjoy watching them too.

Don’t forget this coming Sunday to set your clocks forward one hour :)

drawing: blue jay

April 15, 2017

blue_jay_by_al_lau

The Blue Jay is a clever North American bird. Although the population of Blue Jays in the eastern US declined after industrialization, they eventually adapted and learned to survive in urban environments. They even expanded their range throughout the midwest. Without even seeing a Blue Jay, their loud squawking is recognizable. Blue Jays are omnivorous, mostly consisting of nuts, seeds and fruit in their diet, they also can eat insects and sometimes rodents.

My birdfeeders are not big enough for the Blue Jay, but sometimes they make a cameo appearance. When they do, it is treat to see them.

Happy Easter and Happy Passover all !

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